Tread Softly

Published: Sep 26 , 2013
Author: Alan Smith

Damian McBride, former spic doctor for Gordon Brown (former Labour party leader and British Prime Minister), has revealed how he regularly attempted to discredit the aspiring PM’s rivals by leaking stories about them to the media.

In extracts of a memoir published in the Daily Mail last week, McBride claims he smeared Labour ministers including Charles Clarke and John Reid during Mr Brown's bid to succeed Tony Blair.

Seems like the constant back and forth within the government was downright nasty and this revelation did nothing to endear politicians to an already distrusting British public.

It does not help the current leadership of the Labour party either. Both Ed Miliband and Ed Balls were senior players in Brown’s team. Whilst they have not been directly implicated it seems they will have questions to answer.

I guess the learning here is to be careful what you and your organisation do today as it may come back to bite you in the future.

Steve Jobs left Apple in 1985 after a fall out with his directors and founded NeXt computers. The computers were targeted at the educational market and failed quite spectacularly. Reuters published a piece which publicly slated both NeXt and Jobs, in an overtly personal way.

Wind the clock forward to 1996 and Jobs is now back running Apple and launching new products and services that change the world. One of which was the now ubiquitous Application (App).

When Reuters approached the Apple store with their App, Jobs refused to list it point blank. No discussion.

Being nasty has no place in my view in life or business, not only because it is wrong, it also makes bad sense.

Treading gently does not mean being soft, but it does mean having integrity.

A good measure is if you told your mum what you were about to do, would she approve.

If not have another think.

Alan Smith


SHARE

blogAuthor

About the author:

Alan Smith
No bio is currently avaliable

Latest Blog:

Negotiating Lessons from the Banking Royal Commission

The Australian Banking Royal Commission has been quite embarrassing with cover-ups, poor conduct and unethical treatment of customers. But it does bring to light key lessons for negotiators. These lessons are particularly true for those who are perceived to hold the balance of power. In other words, if you are negotiating with someone who is seen to have very little power - there is a high chance your actions will come under public scrutiny at some point. It is highly unlikely the banking industry will be the only one to come under scrutiny. All you need to do to come to this conclusion is read the paper to see similar accusations in industries like retail/grocery buying, leasing, franchising, etc.

Latest Tweet:

Scotwork Australia
210/410 Elizabeth Street
Surry Hills
2010
Australia
02 9211 3999
info.au@scotwork.com
Follow us
cpd.png
voty2016_sign_gold.png